Swiss Wine Regions

Expovina, Zurich Wine Exhibition

It's the 58th Expovina (Zurich Wine Exhibition). And What is that, you ask? Well, it's just one of the worlds largest wine conventions and probably the most important one for the Swiss wine producers, that's all.

Spread over 12 ships docked at Bürkliplatz, Zurich, it brings together 120 exhibitors with more that 4000 quality wines from around the world, and Switzerland will be well represented.

This well visited, sometimes bustling, wine conventions is a great way to taste a wide variety of wine, learn what's new in the industy, and meet some of the people making it happen. It's also a good way to kick off an evening, and Zurich's Neiderdorf (the old town) is a short stroll away.

November 3, 2011 (All day)
November 17, 2011 (All day)
Events Place: 
Bürkliplatz, Zurich
Tags:

The Wine Grapes of Switzerland

Johannisberg

Second in white wines of Valais (after Fendant). The name Johannisberg is only used in Valais; the rest of French-speaking Switzerland call it Gros Rhin. The grape used to make Johannisberg is the Grüner Sylvaner. The origin of the grape is not clear. On the one hand it strongly resembles the Roman Apianisien (loved by bees) grape, as described by Pliny the Elder in his “Historia naturalis”, on the other hand, its more likely birthplace is in Romanian Transylvania.

Humagne Blanche

Only planted in Valais today, Humagne blanche* is another of the very old Swiss grapes, probably brought in by the Romans. Having a high iron content, and supposedly health-giving properties, this wine was decreed a “health wine” (Krankenwein) for centuries. The old written documents in which this wine is referred to as vinum hum-anum date from the 12th and 14th Centuries. It’s also called Kinderbettenwein or baby crib wine. I’ll bet those kids didn’t have much to cry about.

*no relation to the Humagne Rouge

Lafnetscha

Here’s an obscure language lesson. The name Lafnetscha is derived from the local dialect. Because the grape is harvested early, it makes for a acerbic wine which should not be drunk too young. In the local dialect, the verb to drink is “gelafft”, so laff-nit-scha is drink-not-already (sort of). As to the grape, it is one of the oldest in from Haut-Valais. Almost identical to the Blachier. Please see Completer for more information.

Cabernet will rape you and pinot noir seduces you. ... Cabernet will throw you down and rip your clothes off, and pinot noir subtly convinces you to take them off yourself.

Old French Saying

Swiss Alps, cows, wine bottle and large clock face in Bern, Switzerland

Fine Swiss Wine

Discover Switzerland’s odd grapes, small producers, and eclectic tastes